Archive for the ‘Contests’ Category

Contest Results

I wouldn’t actually call them results, and contest might be too generous a term, but my dad is the “winner” of the “contest.” I guess that’s what I get for posting words from a work that is online in its entirety. The words come from Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Spe Salvi, which I read over Christmas and is very, very good. If anybody would have actually played in the contest (besides my dad, who cheated!), I thought it would have been entertaining, funny, and a little misleading to use a quote by the pope that criticized institutions. But alas, nobody reads my blog!

I would have also accepted “Joseph Ratzinger.”

Contest: Name That Theologian

Welcome back after the New Year.

What currently living theologian wrote these words?

The right state of human affairs, the moral well-being of the world can never be guaranteed simply through structures alone, however good they are. Such structures are not only important, but necessary; yet they cannot and must not marginalize human freedom. Even the best structures function only when the community is animated by convictions capable of motivating people to assent freely to the social order. Freedom requires conviction; conviction does not exist on its own, but must always be gained anew by the community.

I Never Told You the Answer!

I almost completely forgot! The answer to my little guessing game  last week about my tagline—although I assume the people who would know it knew it right away and the people who didn’t know it but cared to know it googled it (verbed!) and the people who still don’t know probably don’t particularly care to know at all—is Calvin and Hobbes. Here’s the context:

Calvin: I like to verb words.
Hobbes: What?

Calvin: I take nouns and adjectives and use them as verbs. Remember when “access” was a thing? Now it’s something we do. It got verbed.

Calvin (next frame): Verbing weirds language.

Hobbes: Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding.

New Tagline, Again

I am growing ever more frenetic with my taglines. The stints of the last two have been quite brief. Who knows how long this one will last? The intrigue! The suspense! The excitement!

If you can guess where this one comes from, I will give you, my friend, one hundred dollars.*

*The money, furnished by solely Jeff Reimer, will be payed out on a cash basis at a rate of $0.01 per year over a period of 10,000 years.

New Tagline

I changed the tagline to this blog. First person to guess where it’s from gets a prize.

Editing Contest Winner

Well, I have now read that stupid sentence way more times than I ever wanted. What was I thinking?

The winner I have chosen is whichever Cochran actually edited the sentence. Circumstantially I would guess my good friend Ryan, who regularly reads this blog. But his wife Katie is the wordsmith of the Cochran household, so I’m thinking either Katie (who I don’t think ever reads this blog) heard about it from Ryan and tried her hand, or Ryan pulled in a ringer. Either way the prize goes to the same place. Here’s the original sentence:

Many Asian American biblical scholars have adopted a multidisciplinary approach to biblical interpretation, drawing upon postcolonial theory, diasporic studies, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, Asian American studies and theology, in addition to traditional biblical exegetical and hermeneutical tools, to craft new, hybridized Asian American biblical hermeneutics that are attentive to the issue of reenvisioning Asian American ethnic-racial identities within their diasporic existence in the United States.

And here are the (now two) sentences as edited (with one typo that the Cochrans introduced edited out!):

Many Asian American biblical scholars have adopted a multidisciplinary approach to biblical interpretation in order to craft new, hybridized Asian American biblical hermeneutics that are attentive to the issue of reenvisioning Asian American ethnic-racial identities within their diasporic existence in the United States. This multidisciplinary approach leads these scholars to draw upon postcolonial theory, diasporic studies, anthropology, sociology, Asian American studies and theology, in addition to traditional biblical exegetical and hermeneutical tools.

All the entries were definite improvements, but the many-headed hydra of qualifiers and subordinate clauses that I originally posted surely works better as two sentences. So I’ll mail you your signed book, it’ll get to the Canadian border in a day or two, and then Canada Post will take care of it for the next six or seven weeks before they deliver it to you. Enjoy!

For Tim: Guess the Author

Per Tim’s comment on my previous post, here is a contest asking readers to “guess the author.” So what novelist wrote the following? And in what work?

If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.

Contest winner for the previous post to be announced on Friday. I can’t promise any prizes for winning this one except the prize of being smug about your literary acumen to the philistines around you. But if you really want a copy of “my book” I’ll send you a personally signed copy.

Contest: Edit This Sentence

“Many Asian American biblical scholars have adopted a multidisciplinary approach to biblical interpretation, drawing upon postcolonial theory, diasporic studies, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, Asian American studies and theology, in addition to traditional biblical exegetical and hermeneutical tools, to craft new, hybridized Asian American biblical hermeneutics that are attentive to the issue of reenvisioning Asian American ethnic-racial identities within their diasporic existence in the United States.”

Best edit gets a signed copy of my book (i.e., the one with yours truly gracing — or disgracing — the cover).

We Have a Winner, Sort of

Well, my readers poll has kind of turned out to be moot. Though all the votes may not have been cast (there’s a delegation recounting votes in Florida right now), I have come to a conclusion, sort of. On Saturday night, on a lark after a fit of despair over the wayward direction being taken in the comment box, I decided to blaze through McCarthy, and I’m halfway finished with the book. But do not lose heart, faithful voters! Because C&P received a staggering twice the number of votes the other books received (i.e., 2 votes, whereas the others received 1 – stuffing of the ballot box and illegal recommendations excepted) I will move on to that next, provided I don’t end it all before I finish The Road. It’s a heartbreaking novel.

No disrespect to Ryan Cordell, though, who enthusiastically managed to put in four votes (three for The Idiot and one for this gem of literary magnificence – it’s a real book! Neither Ryan nor I made this up!). The decision was based on the sheer number of votes received. And be assured, I did not consider the personal source of the votes. (Though in the world of book recommendation, considering the source of the recommendation may prevent not a few reading disasters. But since I had already recommended these three to myself, I figured I needn’t worry. Also, Ryan, if you’re wondering why your name keeps transmogrifying from “Ryan C.” to “Ryan Cordell” in the comment box, it’s because I have another friend named Ryan Cochran who also comments regularly. Moreover, many of the others who comment on this blog know Ryan Cochran and might be confused without my emendations.)

Levi, have you read The Road? What did you think? Others?

Readers Poll: Help Me Decide What to Read!

I’m taking a poll. The current book I’m reading, though good, is extremely dense and long, and my momentum has ground to a halt. I’ve been floundering around with short stories and essays for awhile now, so I’m going to read a novel to pick up some steam. But I can’t decide which one. So, dear reader, I enlist your help. I’ve narrowed it down to three that are already on my bookshelf, but I need some guidance from here. The books are:

Dosoevsky: Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky: The Idiot

Cormac McCarthy: The Road

I will read all of these eventually, so it’s not an incredibly important decision, but my floundering has left me in a vortex of indecision. Help!